Injections may bring relief from Tinnitus

THAT, A 50% CHANCE FOR RAIN. LET’S ENJOY OUR DRY TIME. Janine Stanwood: WE WILL, BETTY, THANKS. HEARING AN ANNOYING RINGING IN YOUR EARS HAPPENS TO JUST ABOUT EVERYBODY BUT FOR SOME THAT NOISE NEVER GOES AWAY. KRISTI KRUEGER IS HERE WITH A NEW TREATMENT THAT COULD HELP. Kristi Krueger: OVER 50 MILLION AMERICANS ACTUALLY SUFFER FROM TINNITUS OR A CHRON CHRONIC EAR CONDITION THAT CAN AFFECT THEIR QUALITY OF LIFE AND THEIR ABILITY TOIER ACT WITH OTHERS AS WELL. IN OUR HEALTH CAST WE TAKE A LOOK AT A GRAND NEW STUDY THAT COULD OFFER RELIEF FROM THAT CONSTANT RINGING IN YOUR EARS. 46-YEAR-OLD CHRISTOPHER BLAYLOCK HAS BEEN DIVING FOR YEARS AND WAS EAGER TO GET IN THE WATER DURING LOBSTER MINI SEASON. I NOTICED ABOUT HALFWAY THROUGH THE DAY MY EARS RINGING, AND I’M LIKE IT’S PROBABLY WATER IN MY EAR AND IT WILL GO AWAY. IT HASN’T GONE AWAY SINCE. Kristi Krueger: TURNS OUT CHRISTOPHER HAD DEVELOP TINNITUS, A CONDITION WHERE PEOPLE HEAR A CONSTANT SOUND IN THEIR EARS. WHAT’S INTERESTING IS THAT SOME PEOPLE ARE ABLE TO PUSH IT IN THE BACK OF THEIR MINDS AND NOT PAY ATTENTION TO IT, AND FOR OTHER PEOPLE IT CAN REALLY BE DISABLEING. Kristi Krueger: EARS, NOSE AND THROAT SPECIALIST CRIME SPECIALIST JOSHUA SLIGHT PARTICIPATING IN A CLINICAL TRIAL THAT MAY HELP SOME PARENTS. SOME FORMS OF TINNITUS ARE PROBABLY AT THE BRAIN PLETSCH OTHER FORMS OF TINNITUS COMING FROM AN INJURY WITHIN THE COCHLEA. FOR PATIENTS WITH TINNITUS AT THE COCHLEAR LEVEL INJECTIONS OF KETAMINE, A SEDATIVE, MAY BE THE SOLUTION. BUT IT’S VERY PROMISING TO SEE THE EFFECTS OF KETAMINE DIRECTLY ON SOME OF THE NEURAL RECEPTORS WITHIN THE COCHLEA AND A REDUCTION OR ELIMINATION OF TINNITUS AS A RESULT THAT OF. BECAUSE THE STUDY IS DOUBLE BLIND CHRISTOPHER DOESN’T REALLY KNOW IF HE’S GOTTEN THE REAL DRUG OR A PLACEBO BUT HE’S KEEPING HIS FINGERS CROSSED. I’M HOPEFUL. I’M HOPEFUL AFTER DEALING WITH IT. IT’S KIND OF LIKE I’LL DO WHATEVER IT TAKES. Kristi Krueger: MY MOM HAS THIS AND I TELL YOU PEOPLE WILL DO WHATEVER IT TAKES. THE TREATMENT WILL NOT BENEFIT

Article source: http://www.local10.com/thats-life/health/injections-may-bring-relief-from-tinnitus/28977458

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Forever young: 5 ways treating hearing loss can revitalize your life

(BPT) – Listen up, boomers: Do you want to stay active? Vibrant? Socially engaged? Professionally successful? Most of us do.

So maybe it’s time to do something about your hearing.

Chances are, if you’re like many baby boomers, you’ve rocked your way through your fair share of concerts, night clubs, and ear-blasting parties. And you’ve enjoyed years of other noisy recreational activities to boot. Simply: You’ve been enjoying life. You’ve spent decades doing it. And it’s been loud.

So now, it’s not always so easy to hear the conversation around the table at the restaurant or dinner party – maybe not even in the conference room at work or on those teleconference calls.

Face it. All that enthusiastic living has been hard on your ears. And now they’re screaming for your attention.

You should give it to them.

In fact, addressing hearing loss is one of the best things you can do to improve your quality of life and keep up a youthful pace.

Fortunately, for most people with hearing loss, today’s state-of-the art hearing aids can help. In fact, eight out of 10 hearing aid users say they’re satisfied with the changes that have occurred in their lives due to their hearing aids.

Many boomers are surprised to learn that dramatic new technological advances have revolutionized hearing aids in recent years. Many hearing aids are virtually invisible, sitting discreetly and comfortably inside the ear canal. And they adjust to all kinds of noise environments, picking up sound from all directions. Some are even waterproof.

Perhaps best of all, seamless connectivity is now the norm. Today’s hearing aids are wireless and stream sound from your smartphone, home entertainment system, and other electronics directly into your hearing aid(s) at volumes just right for you.

Here’s what getting a hearing test and using professionally fitted hearing aids, if recommended by a hearing care professional, may do for you:

1. Unlock your earning potential. Hearing your best at work helps you do your best. One study found that using hearing aids reduced the risk of income loss by 90 to 100 percent for those with milder hearing loss, and from 65 to 77 percent for those with severe to moderate hearing loss. And people with hearing loss who use hearing aids are more likely to be employed than their peers who don’t.

2. Open the door to greater intimacy. Don’t let those sweet nothings go unheard. Feeling emotionally close to your partner is one of the most satisfying aspects of any intimate relationship. But it rests on good communication. When hearing loss goes unaddressed, it can make even the most loving partner seem remote or unresponsive. Luckily, research shows that using hearing aids can help improve interpersonal relationships – including greater intimacy.

3. Pull the plug on stress and boost your mood. People with untreated hearing loss often feel angry, frustrated, anxious, isolated, and depressed. But research shows that when they use hearing aids, their mental health often rallies. Many regain emotional stability, become more socially engaged, feel a greater sense of safety and independence, and see a general improvement in their overall quality of life.

4. Bolster your self-confidence. An important perk of using hearing aids can be enhanced emotional well-being. Research shows that when people with hearing loss use hearing aids, many feel more in control of their lives and less self-critical. One Better Hearing Institute (BHI) study found that the majority of people with mild and severe hearing loss felt better about themselves and life overall as a result of using hearing aids.

5. Improve cognitive functioning. Studies out of Johns Hopkins linked hearing loss with accelerated cognitive decline in older adults and found that seniors with hearing loss are significantly more likely to develop dementia over time. BHI studies found that many people with hearing loss report improvements in their cognitive skills with the use of hearing aids. 

So go ahead. Revitalize your life. Do something about your hearing. It just may help you feel forever young.

For more information – and to take a free, quick and confidential online hearing check to determine if you need a comprehensive hearing test by a hearing care professional – visit www.BetterHearing.org.

Article source: http://scoopsandiego.com/online_features/tech_talk_and_innovation/forever-young-ways-treating-hearing-loss-can-revitalize-your-life/article_ef7c5d77-e71f-574f-8838-f081494fc597.html

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AAO-HNSF clinical practice guideline: Tinnitus

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Contact: Lindsey Walter
[email protected]
703-535-3762
American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

ALEXANDRIA, VA The American Academy of OtolaryngologyHead and Neck Surgery Foundation has released the first ever mutli-disciplinary, evidence-based clinical practice guideline to improve the diagnosis and management of tinnitus, the perception of soundoften ringingwithout an external sound source. The guideline was published today in the journal OtolaryngologyHead and Neck Surgery.

“Tinnitus affects 10-15% of adults in the United States. It is the most common service-related disability among our military veterans. Yet despite its prevalence and effect on quality of life, prior to this there weren’t any evidence-based guidelines about managing tinnitus,” said Sujana S. Chandrasekhar, MD, a co-author of the guideline.

One of the strongest recommendations in the guideline is that clinicians differentiate between bothersome tinnitus and nonbothersome tinnitus. “About 20% of adults who experience tinnitus require clinical intervention, the rest are experiencing nonbothersome tinnitus,” explained Dr. Chandrasekhar.

The guideline, developed by a panel including representatives for otolaryngologists, geriatricians, primary care physicians, nurses, psychiatrists, behavioral neuroscientists, neurologists, radiologists, audiologists, psychoacousticians, and tinnitus patients, gives healthcare providers a framework for care and support in mitigating the personal and social impact that tinnitus can have. The guideline’s recommendations are made by experienced clinicians and methodologists, according to the best scientific evidence.

The guideline authors are: David E. Tunkel, MD; Carol A. Bauer, MD; Gordon H. Sun, MD, MS; Richard M. Rosenfeld, MD, MPH; Sujana S. Chandrasekhar, MD; Eugene R. Cunningham Jr, MS; Sanford M. Archer, MD; Brian W. Blakley, MD, PhD; John M. Carter, MD; Evelyn C. Granieri, MD, MPH, MSEd; James A. Henry, PhD; Deena Hollingsworth, RN, MSN, FNP; Fawad A. Khan, MD; Scott Mitchell, JD, CPA; Ashkan Monfared, MD; Craig W. Newman, PhD; Folashade S. Omole, MD; C. Douglas Phillips, MD; Shannon K. Robinson, MD; Malcolm B. Taw, MD; Richard S. Tyler, PhD; Richard W. Waguespack, MD, and Elizabeth J. Whamond.

Members of the media who wish to obtain a copy of the guideline or request an interview should contact: Lindsey Walter at 1-703-535-3762, or [email protected] Upon release, the guideline can be found at http://www.entnet.org.

About the AAO-HNS/F

The American Academy of OtolaryngologyHead and Neck Surgery, one of the oldest medical associations in the nation, represents about 12,000 physicians and allied health professionals who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the ears, nose, throat, and related structures of the head and neck. The Academy serves its members by facilitating the advancement of the science and art of medicine related to otolaryngology and by representing the specialty in governmental and socioeconomic issues. The AAO-HNS Foundation works to advance the art, science, and ethical practice of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery through education, research, and lifelong learning. The organization’s vision: “Empowering otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeons to deliver the best patient care.”


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Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.

Article source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-10/aaoo-acp092514.php

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ADA Convention Raises the Stakes in Las Vegas, November 6-9

ADA2014-BannerWhere can you find speakers who include Frank Lin, Pawel Jastreboff, Kathleen Campbell, Barbara Weinstein, Larry Humes, Barry Freeman, Brian Taylor, Amyn Amlani, Doug Beck, Dave Fabry, Ron Gleitman and A.U. Bankaitis? At the 2014 Academy of Doctors of Audiology (ADA) Convention entitled “Raising the Stakes: Going All in for Audiology!” which will be held at the Red Rock Resort, Las Vegas, from November 6-9.

According to the Academy, this year’s convention schedule is packed with dynamic sessions designed to provide the latest technology and trends to help your practice achieve explosive growth. You’ll find innovative tools and ideas from the first session to the last exhibit.

The events at a glance are listed below (please check ADA website and final program for updates and changes):

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6

Preconvention Workshops and Courses:

  • 8:00 AM – 3:15 PM: Evaluation and Management of Vestibular Disorders*, by Sam Bittel, AuD
  • 8:00 AM – 11:15 PM: Interventional Audiology, Part 1: Building Bridges to the Physician Community: Co-Morbidity Marketing Workshop*, by Brian Taylor, AuD, and Bob Tysoe
  • 12:00 PM – 3:15 PM: Interventional Audiology, Part 2: Product Dependence: Is It Co-Opting Our Efforts to Become Limited Licensed Providers?*, by Barry Freeman, PhD, Amyn Amlani, PhD, Brian Taylor, AuD, Ian Windmill, PhD
  • 8:00 AM – 3:15 PM: Taking Care of Business* [an all-day super-session], by Sam Rotella, Kevin St Clergy, MS, Steve Woodward, Brendan Ford
  • 8:00 AM – 3:15 PM: ADA Future Audiologist Workshop
  • 8:00 AM – 3:00 PM: CAOHC Professional Supervisors Course

3:30 PM – 5:00 PM: “Game Changer” General Session: The Role of Pharmaceutical Agents in Hearing Loss Management and Prevention, by Kathleen Campbell, PhD

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM   Opening Reception in Exhibit Hall

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM: Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

8:00 AM – 8:30 AM: Welcome and President’s Address, by Brian Urban, AuD

8:30 AM – 9:30 AM: Keynote Address: Hearing Loss and Aging: Consequences, Implications, and Creating Better Outcomes through Alternative Models of Care, by Frank R. Lin, MD, PhD

9:30 AM – 10:00 AM: Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 11:30 AM: “Game Changer” General Session: Hearing Loss and Aging—A Mandate for Intervention and Innovation. Moderator: Dave Fabry, PhD, with Frank Lin, MD, PhD, Larry Humes, PhD, Barbara Weinstein, PhD

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM: Lunch in the Exhibit Hall

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM: Seminars

  • Utilizing Benchmarking in Your Practice, by Mike Lowery
  • Hearing and Healthy Living: The Audiologist – Primary Care Physician Relationship, by Brian Taylor, AuD
  • Ear, Brain, and Hearing Aid Amplification, by Douglas Beck, AuD
  • Ear-Level Instrumentation in the Treatment of Tinnitus, by Pawel Jastreboff, PhD

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM:   Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:00 PM – 4:30 PM: Seminars

  • Know What Marketing Works and How Well It Is Working: Taking the Guesswork out of Marketing Decisions, by Mark Sanford, MS, Mark Harned Cathy Howard
  • Building on a New Healthcare Landscape to Grow Your Practice: Illuminating Co-Morbidities for Effective Physician Outreach, by Alina Urdaneta Tish Ramirez, AuD
  • Ear, Brain, and Hearing Aid Amplification, Part 2, by Douglas Beck, AuD
  • Improving Patient Experience—On the Phone and in Your Office, by Heather Sager Carl Cook

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8

7:30 AM – 8:30 AM: Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

8:00 AM – 9:30 AM: “Game Changer” General Session: Understanding the Speech-Understanding Problems of Older Adults, by Larry Humes, PhD

10:00 AM – 11:30 AM: Live Business Plan Competition

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM: Lunch in the Exhibit Hall (Exhibit Hall closes at 1 PM)

1:00 PM – 2:30 PM: Seminars

  • How to Evaluate and Value Your Business, by Ronald Gleitman, PhD
  • Selling Techniques for Different Personality Types, by Erin Wright, AuD
  • Three Simple Steps to Awesome Aural Rehab, by Dusty Jessen, AuD
  • Who Are We Really Working For? The Complex New Relationship between Audiology and Industry, by David Smriga, MA

2:45 PM – 4:15 PM: Seminars

  • Beating Big Box Retailers at the Price Game: Winning a Fight No One Says You Can Win, by Al Turri, AuD Kevin St Clergy
  • Management of High Frequency Hearing Loss in a Co-Managed Patient Care Model with a New Implantable, by George Cire, AuD, Doug Backous, MD, Michele Fusco, MA
  • Comparing and Contrasting Modified TRT Counseling and Psychological Intervention Within Audiology, Part 1, by Timothy Atchison, PhD, Leslie Dalton, Jr, PhD, Gary Byrd, PhD
  • Exit Strategy Succession Planning, by Andrew Hebert Clifford Carey

4:30 PM – 6:00 PM: Seminars

  • Transitioning Your Practice to a New Owner, by Craig Castelli
  • A Time-Efficient Form for Documenting Hearing Aid Benefit, by Ron Leavitt, AuD Nikki Clark
  • Comparing and Contrasting Modified TRT Counseling and Psychological Intervention Within Audiology, Part 2, by Timothy Atchison, PhD, Leslie Dalton, Jr, PhD, Gary Byrd, PhD
  • 24/7 Hearing for Your Patients: The New Reality with Provocative Challenges, by Helena Solodar, AuD

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9

Seminars (included with convention attendance fee, but preregistration required)

  • 8:00 AM – 9:30: Audiology With a Purpose Game Show, with Tabitha Parent Buck, AuD Douglas Beck, AuD
  • 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM: CAPD: The Elephant in our Heads (Some Assembly Required), by Michael Webb, MS
  • 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM: What Every Audiologist Needs to Know About Asset Protection Tax Reduction and Estate Planning Strategies, by Larry Oxenham
  • 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM: Women Unite, by Natalie Phillips, AuD, Gyl Kasewurm, AuD, D’Anne Rudden, AuD A.U. Bankaitis, PhD

 *Separate registration required

 Note: Schedule subject to change. Check final program and ADA website for latest updates.

To register for the convention, visit the ADA Convention website. Regular registration starts on Jul 08, 2014 and ends on Oct 07, 2014. Late registration starts on Oct 08, 2014.

 Next year: ADA 2015 will be held November 12-15, 2015 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

 

Article source: http://www.hearingreview.com/2014/09/ada-convention-raises-stakes-las-vegas-november-6-9/

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Beltone hearing aids enhance quality of life

“Enhancing the quality of life for those with hearing loss through expert care and customized solutions.”

At the Beltone Hearing Aid Center in Defiance, that’s not just a slogan. It’s a daily event.

“We treat every patient like a dear loved one,” said Jeff Sager, hearing care practitioner and office manager. “We tailor each hearing solution to your lifestyle, preferences and hearing needs.”

The Beltone center is located inside the Northtowne Mall Sears store at 1500 N. Clinton St.

“This is a regional store and we serve a multi-county area,” said Sager. “We were selected as recent winner of the 2013 Circle of Excellence award for patient satisfaction. The company has been around for more than 70 years and we are truly the world’s leading hearing aid company.”

The store has a huge array of tiny hearing aides and Sager said there is a perfect fit for everyone.

“Our products are designed to seamlessly adjust to your changing surroundings as you move through your day. We have all types including in-the-ear, behind-the-ear and open-fit. We have a wide variety of products from TV to church to phone enhancements, so we can improve your environment wherever you need it.”

Sager strongly encouraged area residents to contact the office for a free hearing test, especially with the holidays coming up.

“We realize many people are reluctant to take the first step and get tested. It’s much like a root canal, you really don’t want to do it but you really can’t afford not to do so. With so many family activities and gatherings over Thanksgiving and Christmas, you really can’t afford to miss what’s happening and what is being said.”

Sager invited the public to visit the Beltone office for a free “test drive.”

“We offer you the opportunity to sample a hearing aid in the office before you buy it to see what it sounds like in a variety of listening situations. Beltone has the best hearing instruments in the industry and they can simulate the closest thing to normal hearing.”

By taking an early step to diagnose hearing loss, you can even avoid or prepare for the future need for hearing aids.

“Hearing loss develops gradually, you may not know you have it,” said Sager. “Because hearing loss is often permanent, it’s best to find out as soon as possible. Treating hearing loss can stop it from becoming worse and preserve good hearing for life. It can also help prevent certain medical conditions, such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.”

With many current and retired factory workers in rural northwest Ohio, the potential for hearing loss is greater than many other areas of the country.

“Working in loud environments over an extended period of time is bound to affect your hearing,” said Sager. “We strongly advise making an appointment for a free hearing test with one of our licensed Beltone Hearing Care professionals. The hearing test will tell you what you’re hearing and what you are missing.”

For additional questions about hearing loss or more information about the services and products of the Beltone Hearing Center in Defiance, call 419-782-2332 or visit the company website at: beltonehearingaid.com.

“Our company and its hearing care network has received patient satisfaction ratings in the 96th percentile for products and service,” said Sager. “That’s because we treat every patient like a dear loved one.”

Article source: http://www.crescent-news.com/local%20business/2014/09/26/beltone-hearing-aids-enhance-quality-of-life

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Consumerization of healthcare: why the hearing aid market might be the next to …

motohint
Image: Motorola

We went to see an elderly family friend this weekend. The first thing we noticed upon entering her house was the decibel level. She was watching a game show on TV, and the volume was set so high it was like being hit by a fire hose of sound.

Think of it as Google Glass, but for the ear.

She’s in her 80s and uses a hearing aid. Unfortunately, she told us her $ 3,000+ hearing aid doesn’t work worth a darn, insurance won’t cover a replacement, and so she listens to the TV at a level that makes the shingles on the roof vibrate.

I didn’t know much about hearing aids, but I learned a lot talking to our elderly friend and my wife, who’s an RN.

The hearing aid business is huge. According to The Hearing Review, nearly 3 million hearing aids were “dispensed” in 2013, a full 20 percent of which were distributed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. This market usually grows at about 2-4 percent per year, but last year it grew by 4.8 percent.

With hearing aids starting at about $ 1,400 each and going up and up and up in price, the hearing aid market is at least worth $ 5 billion. Now, it turns out that, as with many medically-dispensed devices, hearing aids come in a huge variety, based on patient need — from those that just sit behind the ear and magnify sound to those that are surgically installed inside the ear for a direct tech-to-bone connection.

This is a huge market even if you ignore the most medically complex devices. 52.2 percent of all hearing aids dispensed in 2013 were like my friend’s — a behind-the-ear device that pumps sound into an earplug either via a wire or — like those nasty headphones on airplanes — by air pressure.

I’ve been thinking a lot about consumer electronics and health-related devices ever since the Apple Watch announcement. My wife has an Android Wear watch that connects to her phone, and we’ve been nosing around an upcoming device called the Moto Hint.

The Moto Hint is a very tiny Bluetooth earphone that fits inside the ear and, in addition to answering the phone and letting you talk, it can send Okay Google (and, presumably Siri) queries to a linked smartphone. Now, rather than just answering the phone, you can actually talk to your phone through just the device mounted in the ear.

Think of it as Google Glass, but for the ear.

This got me thinking about my friend. As a consumer device, the Hint is a little pricey: $ 149 for a Bluetooth earphone is a bit much. But $ 149 for a replacement hearing aid is disruptive, 1/20th of the price that my friend had to pay — and then couldn’t replace.

As it turns out, there’s a category of devices that help hearing but aren’t allowed to be called hearing aids. According to the FDA (which is the agency that regulates hearing aids in the United States), these are Personal Sound Amplification Devices (PSADs). A 2009-vintage Web page on the FDA site describes “Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplifiers: Know the Difference.”

According to Dr. Eric Mann, Deputy Director of FDA’s Division of Ophthalmic, Neurological, And Ear, Nose, and Throat Devices, “Hearing aids and personal sound amplification products (PSAPS) can both improve our ability to hear sound. They are both wearable, and some of their technology and function is similar.”

Remember, though, that this was posted on October 20, 2009. This was iPhone 3GS vintage. The iPad hadn’t even been released yet. Bluetooth 3.0 had just been adopted as a standard. There was no low-energy, long-lasting Bluetooth. Inductive chargers were rare. Windows 7 was still two days from being released to the general public.

You get the idea. A lot has changed in the consumer technology world since the FDA last updated its advice on hearing aids.

The FDA site goes on to give some very sound advice from Dr. Mann, which I’ll pass along to you (and then criticize):

Mann notes, however, that the products are different in that only hearing aids are intended to make up for impaired hearing.

He says consumers should buy a personal sound amplifier only after ruling out hearing loss as a reason for getting one. “If you suspect hearing loss, get your hearing evaluated by a health care professional,” he adds.

Choosing a PSAP as a substitute for a hearing aid can lead to more damage to your hearing, says Mann. “It can cause a delay in diagnosis of a potentially treatable condition. And that delay can allow the condition to get worse and lead to other complications,” he says.

Clearly, any discussion of anything medical should include the suggestion to see your doctor. So I dutifully remind you that I’m not a medical professional and suggest that you go see your doctor.

All of this is a given. But in a world where insurance rules, sometimes seeing a doctor won’t solve the problem. My elderly friend is a good example. She’s in her 80s, knows quite well she has hearing loss, and has been prescribed (and has paid for out of her limited fixed income and dwindling savings), a hearing aid that no longer works.

Also, a lot of people who have been diagnosed with hearing loss and told they need a hearing aid avoid getting one for fear of looking old. This isn’t an issue of simple vanity, it may put careers and potential relationships at risk, especially in markets where age is a prejudicial issue. By replacing the hearing aid with an exciting new Bluetooth headset, wearers no longer have to appear “old and out of touch”. Instead, they’ll fit in by looking just as dorky as anyone else with a Bluetooth headset.

In a perfect world, my friend would be able to get another hearing aid and be done with it. But we don’t live in a perfect world — and hearing aids have certain limitations that Bluetooth earphones do not.

For example, with a hearing aid, she has difficulty bringing her Moto X up to her ear and listening, because the hearing aid gets in the way. So she uses the Moto X on the other ear, which means she’s always shouting into the phone and can’t hear anyone on the other end.

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She’s also not yet used to the idea of carrying her phone with her everywhere she goes. When she goes from her living room to her bedroom (using a cane or a walker), she often leaves her phone in the other room. She has her hearing aid on, but it doesn’t do much good, which is why the TV blares at such a high volume.

On the other hand, if she had a device like the Moto Hint, she could theoretically leave her phone on its charger and still answer calls. She could tell the Hint who to dial (“Call my son”) and it send that request to Okay Google. Okay Google, running on the Moto X, would dial the phone, pumping sound directly into her ear in via the Moto Hint earpiece.

Let me note now that I haven’t looked at the Hint yet, so I’m just working off the marketing literature. This is all assuming it works as promised. Given how nice the Moto X and the Moto 360 have turned out to be, I’m guessing the Hint might be all it promises, as well.

But what about listening to TV? Well, with something like a Bluetooth earpiece, she could theoretically bind the TV to her earpiece and listen to it in her ear without all the ambient sound pollution. Not all TVs have a Bluetooth output, but there are many Bluetooth transmitters that can solve this problem for under $ 100.

Finally, what about talking to people in the room and, you know, hearing? I typed “hearing aid” into the search box on the Google Play store and it turned up scroll after scroll of apps that promised to take ambient sound, amplify it, and pump it to a Bluetooth earpiece.

All of this falls into the category of consumerization of healthcare, but with the extreme costs and unhelpful insurance companies, patients are taking matters into their own hands. Clearly, the $ 149 cost of the Moto Hint and the various free or $ 0.99 hearing aid apps don’t come with an audiologist consult, but for struggling, abandoned patients like my friend, this new crop of small, highly sophisticated Bluetooth headsets might be a game changer.

What other fields are ripe for disruption? TalkBack below.

By the way, I’m doing more updates on Twitter and Facebook than ever before. Be sure to follow me on Twitter at @DavidGewirtz and on Facebook at Facebook.com/DavidGewirtz.

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/consumerization-of-healthcare-why-the-hearing-aid-market-might-be-the-next-to-feel-disruption-7000033949/

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A recent study discovered that coffee may help tinnitus.

(TRFW News) Coffee… Some people love it, while others hate it. It appears that there is a 50/50 balance on the number of people that drink coffee. According to Statistic Brain, approximately 54% of Americans over the age of 18 consume coffee on a daily basis and 35% of them like it black. Additionally, 65% of the people consume the beverage during breakfast hours. (1)

Is coffee good for you?

I personally don’t like coffee and cringe when my friends want to hang out at Starbucks for the risk of reeking coffee for the rest of the day. Despite of my preferences, coffee does have some health benefits when consumed moderately. For example, the coffee beans have good sources of antioxidants, bioflavonoids, vitamins, and minerals that work together to promote health. (2)

It also appears that there are many studies that show the benefits of coffee for various ailments. According to JAMA, researchers found that higher coffee and caffeine intake is associated with a significantly lower incidence of Parkinson’s disease. (3)

In another study conducted in 2011, nearly 50,000 men drank 6 cups of coffee per day. Researchers found that these men had a 60% lower risk of prostate cancer. Those who consumed 3 cups per day had a 30% lower risk. (4)

The list goes on and many studies found that coffee can help liver, kidney, and colorectal cancers; as well as heart rhythm problems, strokes, pulmonary function, and gastrointestinal flora. (5)

Some of our other article publishing found that coffee could decrease the overall cardiovascular mortality, as well as boost athletic performance and prevent muscle loss.

New study found that coffee might actually help tinnitus.

According to the American Tinnitus Association, tinnitus is the medical term for the perception of sound in one or both ears or in the head when no external sound is present. It is often referred to as “ringing in the ears,” although some people have reported hearing sounds such as hissing, roaring, whistling, chirping, or clicking. Approximately 50 million Americans suffer from tinnitus in some degree. (6)

Tinnitus is typically not a serious condition, however, it can significantly impact your quality of life. It may also get worse as you age or be a symptom of an underlying condition such as age-related hearing loss, ear injury, or circulatory system disorder. (7)

Interestingly, new research found that women who drank higher amounts of caffeine in the form of coffee were less likely to have tinnitus. (8) More specifically, women who consumed less than 150 milligrams of caffeine per day were 15% more likely to develop tinnitus than those who consumed between 450 to 599 milligrams per day! (9)

What researchers found is that caffeine can help reduce tinnitus risk, however, they weren’t exactly sure why. Past research did find that it might be a result from a direct effect on the inner ear or the stimulation of the central nervous system. (5)

Sources for this article include:

(1) www.statisticbrain.com
(2) www.rsc.org
(3) jama.jamanetwork.com
(4) jnci.oxfordjournals.org
(5) articles.mercola.com
(6) www.ata.org
(7) www.mayoclinic.org
(8) www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
(9) www.medicinenet.com

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Article source: http://news.therawfoodworld.com/recent-study-discovered-coffee-may-help-tinnitus/

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